Council on Research and Evaluation (CORE)

 

Purpose

Download this one page flyer about CORE to print or share.     

The CORE serves as a focus for the identification and discussion of issues regarding research and evaluation; serves as a representative voice of the research and evaluation activities within the AUCD Network; and influences the development and implementation of initiatives relevant to achieving and sustaining appropriate research and evaluation activities to guide the development of national policies.

 
 

How CORE Relates to AUCD and Its Work

The CORE fulfills its purpose and the mission of AUCD and its constituent membership by serving as a conduit for technical assistance, providing input into policy, and engaging in other support activities deemed necessary to advance the mandate for research and evaluation. The Council helps the association to:

  • Set and accomplish its research goals specified in the AUCD Strategic Map.
  • Carry out training activities to inform network members on important and emerging research and evaluation topics.
  • Develop the research capacity of each network member to conduct quality research and sound evaluation activities.
  • Identify topics of common interests to network members and develop recommendations to the AUCD Board.
  • Lead the Network in involving people with disabilities and their family members to participate in research and evaluation activities.

 
 

Membership

The Council on Research and Evaluation, known as CORE, is made up of individuals whose work is related to or who is interested in research and evaluation. CORE members are from each Center and program across the AUCD network. Membership is open to anyone in the AUCD network who chooses to join the CORE by selecting the CORE in their AUCD Directory. Each network member can also designate an individual representative who will cast one vote when a matter before the Council requires such an action. Members of the CORE are expected to attend the membership meeting during AUCD Annual Conferences and quarterly conference calls.

 
 

2018 Focus Areas

The 2018 CORE annual plan includes:

  • Involving individuals with disabilities as researchers in research teams by developing recommendations for working with university IRBs, by sponsoring a Driving Change session on this topic during the 2018 AUCD Conference, and by editing a book focusing on participatory research.
  • Providing training to Network members on how to evaluate the UCEDD core grants.
  • Develop recommendations to the Network on accessible methods of data visualization for people with disabilities.
 
 

CORE Leadership

Chair: Ronda Jenson, Ph.D.

Email: Ronda.Jenson@nau.edu

 
 

Upcoming Events of Interest to CORE Members

More Events >

 
 

NEW on the CORE
Web Pages

 
James Booth, Vanderbilt Peabody College, principal investigator

10/21/2019

$3.2M Grant to Fund Study of Reading Skills in Children who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing at Vanderbilt (TN IDDRC/UCEDD/LEND)

Vanderbilt Kennedy Center (TN IDDRC, UCEDD, LEND) Investigator James R. Booth, Ph.D., has been awarded a $3.2 million grant by the National Institutes of Health to better understand how children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) excel at reading.

 
 
(L-R) Maura Rouse, PsyD, HSPP and Brett Enneking, PsyD, HSPP

10/21/2019

Indiana LEND Faculty Receive Grant to Increase Access

Previous LEND trainees and current Indiana LEND faculty, Maura Rouse, PsyD, HSPP and Brett Enneking, PsyD, HSPP, were recently awarded grant funding for their project to bring the telehealth model of care into the Indiana University/Riley Hospital for Children LEND clinic. Their project builds on previous care coordination research demonstrating that families need continued education and support related to diagnosis (e.g. autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability) and treatment following their child's initial evaluation. As Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University is one of the premier care centers for children with neurodevelopmental disabilities in the state of Indiana, approximately 68% of the families travel more than an hour to receive this high quality care for their child.

 
 

10/7/2019

Iowa LEND Trainees Begin the Year with a Poverty Simulation

What is it like to live without enough money to buy groceries for your family? Or pay for bus fare to get to the market? How do you find a job that provides a living wage? Or get to a job interview if you can't afford child care for your toddler? The new class of trainees from Iowa's LEND program encountered these issues and others, while participating in a poverty simulation to launch their training year.

 
 

9/23/2019

Local Partnership Leads to International Connections (MT UCEDD)

In the fall of 2018, the Rural Institute for Inclusive Communities at the University of Montana (UM) and Summit Independent Living Center hosted Ms. Nguyen Thi Van, from Hanoi, Vietnam, who was visiting Missoula, MT as a Mansfield Center Professional Fellow. Van represents two organizations that provide vocational training and independent living skills for people with disabilities in Vietnam.

 

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